ARCHIVED - Official Languages Matrix - Ombudsman Concerns Dated 30 January 08

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Enclosure to Chief of the Defence Staff Thanks Ombudsman for Continued Support, Provides Responses from Chains of Command

Official Languages Matrix - Ombudsman Concerns Dated 30 January 08

IssueAction RequiredLand Force Area HQ Gagetown ResponseLand Force Quebec Area HQ/St-Jean ResponseChief Military Personnel Response
Safety and Security Standard posters regarding food allergies produced and distributed (and posted) to all kitchen halls by 20 Feb 2008. Bilingual posters regarding food allergies are now posted in all Kitchens/Mess halls. Bilingual posters regarding food allergies have been produced and are now posted in all Kitchens/Mess halls at the St-Jean Garrison. All signs/posters are RMC St-Jean used to inform personnel or provide directives are bilingual. Only the signage on the site for the Fort is unilingual, but with the re-opening of RMC St-Jean those are being redone to a bilingual standard.
  Ensure there is an appropriate manning of bilingual kitchen/mess hall personnel Appropriate manning of bilingual staff in mess halls – plan to be in place within 30 days. Expect this will be a long-term solution. In the short term, cards will be available in French that can be handed out to anybody with a concern that they call and reach someone who can address their concern.

We are aware that we must offer bilingual services in the kitchen and mess halls. However we are experiencing difficulties with the structure in place that seems to be hard to resolve in the short-term. The structure has a mixed workforce of military members, civilian employees and employees from private agencies. In order to minimize workplace conflict related to the different employer directives, a rotation involves personnel to be tasked at the cash register, the kitchen or dining hall.
 

Short-term solution
We are looking at offering Second Language Training to the personnel on a voluntary basis. We will also provide work tools to the personnel such as “aide-memoirs” that offer typical phrases, key words in English. We have identified the bilingual personnel. Our hope is that a unilingual employee will be able to refer a client requesting services in English to a bilingual employee within 5 minutes.

 
  Fire drill SOP in both OL with direction given to conduct in both OL. Fire drill SOPs in both OL are completed and readily available. The St-Jean Garrison Coordinator confirms that all fire drills are conducted in both Official Languages and that the CO of 5 ASG signed the bilingual evacuation plan in August 2007. Furthermore, the St-Jean Garrison Coordinator is ensuring that all existing bilingual SOP are distributed.  
  Fire Ranges SOP produced bilingually. All direction provided in both official language. Fire ranges to ask for roster/nominal roll ahead of time with language preferences of each individual known.

Range SOPs are available in bilingual format – future ranges will be made available in both languages.
 

All CTC Schools and Units will conduct bilingual fire drills annually and all ranges practises will be conducted in the language of the course undergoing the training. In the case of bilingual serials, Comd CTC has directed that the words of command on all firing points will be given in both official languages.

There are two types of security measures on the firing ranges as follows:
 

Written directives:
“Regulations for the Firing Ranges and Training Areas.” Two versions exist, one for Valcartier and one for Farnham and all versions are bilingual.
 

Verbal Instructions
Range Control on the Firing Range. Most of the time, verbal exchange is done in French but an English capacity to respond is available.
 

Personnel and Patrol personnel of the Firing Ranges
These personnel communicate with the units and not directly with the candidates who are on course.
 
Therefore, if we know the unit on the range cannot speak French, we take administrative measures so that the Patrol personnel can speak with the personnel on the firing range in the second languages. It happens that in Farnham, the range control officer must ensure that bilingual personnel are disposed in order to service some Reserve Force units.
 

As for security directives transmitted to the personnel in training, this responsibility falls to the unit using the range. It is the responsibility of the Officer or the Officer in charge of security of the firing range who must ensure that all personnel on training, all unit personnel and the support personnel understand the safety regulations and the unfolding of the exercise. These persons are named by the Commander of the Unit, who is ultimately the overall responsible OPI for the training of his/her troops.

All commands on the range are given in the first official language of each specific platoon, as are all weapons classes prior to reaching the range. Candidates are not allowed on the range unless they understand all safety instructions and can handle their weapons in a safe manner.
Health Services Ensure that an appropriate # of health care personnel are available to provide effective services to mbrs in their first OL    

In general, the Canadian Forces Health Services Group endures the same challenges when it comes to bilingualism as other DND organizations. However, it must also accommodate provincial and organizational realities in order to ensure that adequate health services are delivered.
 

DGHS has launched some corrective measures. Further, 42 CF H Svcs C Gagetown sent a request to the CF H Svcs Gp HQ to have the unit’s organization reviewed by the Group’s Official Languages Coordinator to confirm which positions should be bilingual. This health centre will continue to fill public service positions that are designated as bilingual with suitably qualified personnel and, if possible, bilingual personnel into non bilingual positions, but not at the expense of the employment criteria related to that position. CF and Public Service personnel will be encouraged to take advantage of second language training opportunities, when the operational temp permits, and to request continuous second language training.
 

42 CF H Svcs Gagetown will also continue to ask the career management system for bilingual personnel and will continue to improve signage in the clinic as well as signs designating bilingual personnel workspaces.

Anglophone students expressed concerns about the fact that their medical records were maintained in French, and the implications that this would have when a unilingual Anglophone medical staff had to consult those records in the future.      

The CF H Svcs Gp considers the original medical document as the document of record, therefore, current policy or current practice does not provide for the translation of medical documents to the other official language for the purpose of delivering health care. Should a health care provider need to refer to information contained in a medical document written in an official language not understood by the provider, he or she will consult with a medical professional for confirmation purposes. The CF H Svcs Gp remains committed to treat patients in their language of choice. However, in order to accurately record treatments, the standard of practice is to capture the information in the work language of the unit providing care. This standard of practice is consistent for documents written in French about Anglophone patients and documents written in English for Francophone patients. No particular or specific obligation exists in the federal legislation with regards to translating in the other official language the medical files of a military member of the Canadian Forces. The health service is of personal nature and is delivered by an institution subjected to the Official Languages Act (OLA) which entails that there is an obligation to provide this service in the language of choice of the military under some conditions.
 

Although the directives in National Defence are not very clear, the practice and the intent are to provide the medical services in the official language of choice of the CF military member. However, the documentation that builds a medical file is generally produced in the language of work of a unit, which may be different from the language of service. Thus, if it occurred that an Anglophone military member is treated in a French-speaking medical center, the consultations would be held in English whereas all hand-written documentation by the physicians or nurse will most probably be produced in French and placed on the file of the member as such. The service has therefore been offered in the language of choice of the patient and the file kept in the language of work of the unit. One could presume that at training bases, such as St-Jean, Borden and Gagetown, sufficient bilingual practitioners should be available to provide care to service members in their official language of choice. One of the items noted within the letter to the CDS speaks about the patient feeling uncomfortable having a second person in the room translating for the primary care giver. This personal preference may have to be set aside in order to meet standard care, patient safety and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms requirements.
 

In reference to the concern about medical documentation being in the other official language, there are a few secondary effects: a) the patient may not understand their own file; b) subsequent practitioners who don’t completely understand the nuances of the other language may misunderstand; and c) translation is an imperfect skill and therefore concepts or accuracy may be lost. The fallout is the same; the quality of patient care may be compromised. (Solution: Continuous monitoring of translation providers to ensure that the documents reflect the original intent and accuracy.)

COL visibility Reinforce role of COL by producing a message to be distributed to all Unit CO indicating who is the COL and what is their duty. Bcomd should invite COL to their O’Groups and encourage and OL presentation on an annual basis. See note 1 below.

LFAA letter to all Fmn Comd and Unit COs promoting the role of the BCOL (Base Coordinator Official Languages) and UCOLs (Unit Coordinator Official Language) to be issued. See Terms of Reference at the end of matrix already in use.
 

Base CO will invite OL Coord to meetings and request a presentation on OL annually.

Current situation: The J1 occupies the Area OL Coord tasks. The J1 role in this matter consists mostly to act as advisor to the Area Comd and also to serve as the functional guidance manager to the Garrison OL Coord in the Area. The management of the OL program under LFQA is devolved to the CO of 5 ASG. There are no full time OL Coord positions in 5 ASG. The role is given as a secondary duty to the adjt of the ASU Montreal. Under the OL Coord there is an asst OL Coord and two clerks. Both CFLRS and RMC St-Jean have identified OL Coordinators (as secondary duty).
  Ensure that OL Coordinators are prominent in the structure of schools and units and hold consistent rank level for similar responsibilities Ongoing revision through the Army Command Advisor on Official Languages. 90 % of OL Coordinators are AS-04 or military equivalent.

Base CO will invite OL Coord to meetings and request a presentation on OL annually.
 

CO of 5 ASG will invite OL Coord to meetings and request annual OL presentation. Furthermore, the possibility to integrate the OL into mandated programs at 5 ASG can be explored. The awareness presentation could focus on OL, linguistic rights, etc, and last approximately 45 minutes.
 

12 July 2005, the CO of 5 ASG sent out a letter to all units asking them to identify a Unit OL Coord (UCOL). This letter also indicated to nominated a UCOL with the appropriate rank level (WO and above) and that they be granted direct access to the CO. The exercise was completed in 2006.
 

Ongoing revision through the Army Command Advisor on Official Languages. 90 % of OL Coordinators are AS-04 or military equivalent.

 
Instruction Include OL policy in all course orientation periods, to include informing students on rights and responsibilities and producing a document for their signature and copy PA to crse file.

CTC is currently drafting a directive that clearly outlines the linguistic rights of all personnel within the formation (students included). This bilingual directive will be posted in every school and unit across the formation. All CTC pers will sign a linguistic contract that all personnel (including students) will sign during the in-clearance procedures at every school and unit within the formation. These signed documents will be maintained at the unit Orderly Rooms for periodic inspection. Furthermore, a bilingual briefing, prepared by CTCHQ G1 Staff, on linguistic rights will be given during all indoctrination courses for students and staff.
 

Any member can bring up OL issues they may encounter to their CofC.

Any member can bring up OL issues they may encounter to their CofC.

At CFLRS, OL Act is presented in period CR-04 in the first few weeks of training; gives an outline of the OL Act and the statement of CF policy of OL. The Standard Operating Procedures is given on the first day of training. The instructors provide info to the candidates that CFLRS is committed to ensure candidates receive instruction in the official language of their choice.
 

Any member can bring up OL issues they may encounter to their CofC.

  Monitor the number of It & E courses provided for military members in both OL.

 

CTC will monitor and report back to LFDTS quarterly, though the respective Official Languages Coordinators, all issues of this nature. Although the availability of qualified Francophone instructors and the Force Generation requirements of the Field Force will restrict my ability to ensure complete compliance, CTC will continue to seek support through DLFR and the CFTPO process to ensure, where possible, that the waiting times for Francophone and Anglophone students are similar. It must also be noted that CTC is short several Anglophone instructors. Currently, the clear majority of training conducted at CTC does not disadvantage Francophone students.
 

An equal number of English and French serials will never be able to occur. The goal is to ensure that all IT& E is available at the right time in a member’s career so that they can ultimately do their job and advance in their career. Serials are conducted considering a minimum number of students to ensure that the course is pedagogically sound, as a large portion of IT&E requires high student/student interaction for the learning process to occur, qualified instructors are available, and finally resources are available to conduct the course.

 

G1 OL Annual ReportIt should nevertheless be noted that in order to address the wait times for all students CDA is looking at mechanisms to streamline the training process including:

-Better synchronization of recruiting efforts and scheduling of courses;

-Improved Basic Training List Management so that students can receive either additional Individual Training and Education (IT&E) or employment that will benefit them and shorten their path to the operationally ready point while waiting for qualification courses.

-Improved use of other training delivery mechanisms that offer flexibility including civilian academic providers, contracted-in resources and learning technology.
 

An equal number of English and French serials will never be able to occur. The goal is to ensure that all IT& E is available at the right time in a member’s career so that they can ultimately do their job and advance in their career. Serials are conducted considering a minimum number of students to ensure that the course is pedagogically sound, as a large portion of IT&E requires high student/student interaction for the learning process to occur, qualified instructors are available, and finally resources are available to conduct the course.

There are no disparity in waiting times for English or French students at both CFLRS and RMC St-Jean.
 

It should nevertheless be noted that in order to address the wait times for all students CDA is looking at mechanisms to streamline the training process including:

-Better synchronization of recruiting efforts and scheduling of courses;

-Improved Basic Training List Management so that students can receive either additional Individual Training and Education (IT&E) or employment that will benefit them and shorten their path to the operationally ready point while waiting for qualification courses.

-Improved use of other training delivery mechanisms that offer flexibility including civilian academic providers, contracted-in resources and learning technology.
 

An equal number of English and French serials will never be able to occur. The goal is to ensure that all IT&E is available at the right time in a member’s career so that they can ultimately do their job and advance in their career. Serials are conducted considering a minimum number of students to ensure that the course is pedagogically sound, as a large portion of IT&E requires high student/student interaction for the learning process to occur, qualified instructors are available, and finally resources are available to conduct the course.
 

At both CFLRS and RMC St-Jean there are no unilingual career courses disadvantaging Francophones or Anglophones.

Equitable # of bilingual staff Advise on units requiring bilingual manning consideration according to established criteria. CTC is mandated to ensure there is an adequate number of instructors (Francophone and/or Anglophone) before each serial commences. This is done to ensure the standard of training is not compromised. Although we ensure the standard is maintained, our mitigation strategy during the past three years often forces us to conduct training under less than idea circumstances. It is not uncommon for a course to be conducted without the full compliment of instructors and support staff. Clearly, this places additional burden on our staff and is not unique to Francophone instructors. The Force Generation requirements of the CF and Army force my staff to balance the needs of the CF with the pers tempo of CTC’s instructors and support staff. These decisions are not taken lightly and the School Cmdts have been asked to make this the exception vice the norm. With a manning increase of bilingual instructors, CTC should be able to reduce and perhaps even eliminate the need to conduct training under less than idea conditions. Overall, CTC is currently short 100 instructors (Francophone and Anglophone).   Bilingual personnel are strength of the organization. In CFLRS, 55.6% are considered bilingual. The exact requirements for bilingual personnel at CFLRS are being reviewed. It is currently assessed that all support staff plus 35% of the instructors should be bilingual, as 75-80% of its business is conducted in English. As this list is completed it will be transmitted to DGRMC to facilitate posting of qualified personnel.
Translation services

Distribute directive already in works that already ensures provision of adequate translation services.

CANLANDGEN to be drafted by G1 OL

Land Force Command has in place a Partnership Agreement with PWGSC that provides for access to ALL LFC units to have access using on-line request to a full range of translation services. To meet LFC needs, PWGSC makes available the following:

-LFC is served on site by a service point on the premises (NDHQ)

-LFC benefits from an integrated network of professionals who are specialized in various fields of activity.

-LFC can easily submit translation service requests using the On-line Ordering system, which is available at any time. LFC also has on-site translators in Gagetown, Kingston, Valcartier, and Headquarters.

-LFC can submit terminological enquiries to the Terminology Standardization Directorate

-LFC has access through this agreement to translation, revision services, various linguistic services, on-site translators, conference interpretation services and various terminology services.

Land Force Command has in place a Partnership Agreement with PWGSC that provides for access to ALL LFC units to have access using on-line request to a full range of translation services. To meet LFC needs, PWGSC makes available the following:

-LFC is served on site by a service point on the premises (NDHQ)-LFC benefits from an integrated network of professionals who are specialized in various fields of activity.

-LFC can easily submit translation service requests using the On-line Ordering system, which is available at any time. LFC also has on-site translators in Gagetown, Kingston, Valcartier, and Headquarters.

-LFC can submit terminological enquiries to the Terminology Standardization Directorate

-LFC has access through this agreement to translation, revision services, various linguistic services, on-site translators, conference interpretation services and various terminology services.

Translations performed professionally still require revision for technical words and context. Instructors are best positioned to do this, and their efforts and qualifications in that regard are recognized. The internal Chain of Command (CoC) manages the workload of all its instructors, and uses their language skills to the best of their abilities. This implies continual move of personnel to position the right personnel on the right course at the right time, so that the work is divided as evenly as possible. This requires an immense amount of coordination, flexibility and monitoring, but in the end, works very well.
 

In order to reduce the requirement to have instructors devote time to translation, CFLRS is in the process of hiring two IS-02 curriculum development personnel who will be given the revision responsibilities as part of the work description. A third IS-02 is added to the request by CDA, for the same functions at RMC St-Jean. Additional funding for those positions was requested, supported by CDA. Target date for positions implementation is July 08.

Leadership Letter from CLS to senior leadership reinforcing their obligations to foster a bilingual workforce. Base Comd will action this with his direct reports. OL Awareness sessions will be provided at annual Executive meeting of Commander LFQA.

CFLRS and RMC St-Jean work continuously in both official languages. Prior to the Ombudsman’s visit, Commander CDA has requested Staff Assistance Visits be performed to examine the OL situation in St-Jean. This was accomplished 23-25 Oct 2007.
 

Both CFLRS and RMC St-Jean have identified OL Coordinators (as secondary duties).

  Include OL obligations in performance assessments for senior management as part of the accountability framework for the OL Programme

Command Advisor Official Languages visit each Army Base minimum once per year to analyze the OL situation. These visits including meeting with the Base Commander and units. On-going support to the Base and Area Coordinators of Officials Languages is ensured. The network of OL Coordinators is strong. 95% of the Coordinators occupy the position on a full-time basis. OL is their primary task.
 

Area Comd will also issue an annual letter through Chain of Command.
 

Annual letter on OL obligations signed by CDS and then reinforced CLS sent to all Army Cols and above (both Regular and Reserve Force personnel) sent 12 June 2007 and 30 July 2007. Key message from letter:
 

“It is a leadership responsibility to contribute and maintain a workplace conducive to the use of both official languages as required by the Official Languages Act. As such measurable performance objectives, such as chairing bilingual meetings, maintaining one’s own second language proficiency and communicating with employees or CF members in the OL of their choice should be integrated into the DPR process.”

Command Advisor Official Languages visit each Army Base minimum once per year to analyze the OL situation. These visits including meeting with the Base Commander and units. On-going support to the Base and Area Coordinators of Officials Languages is ensured. The network of OL Coordinators is strong. 95% of the Coordinators occupy the position on a full-time basis. OL is their primary task.
 

Various merit boards of the senior leadership are convened for both Regular Force and Reserve Force members and they address requirements pertaining to the OLA.
 

Annual letter on OL obligations signed by CDS and then reinforced CLS sent to all Army Cols and above (both Regular and Reserve Force personnel) sent 12 June 2007 and 30 July 2007. Key message from letter:
 

“It is a leadership responsibility to contribute and maintain a workplace conducive to the use of both official languages as required by the Official Languages Act. As such measurable performance objectives, such as chairing bilingual meetings, maintaining one’s own second language proficiency and communicating with employees or CF members in the OL of their choice should be integrated into the DPR process.”

 
Cohesive Military Family Ensure the environments are perceived as welcoming for minority linguistic groups Command survey will be conducted in March will results produced by 15 April 2008. Command survey will be conducted in March will results produced by 15 April 2008. After verification, both CFLRS and RMC St-Jean indicate there is neither perception nor demonstration of a gap or bitterness between the two groups there.

 

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Additional Table on Observations

ObservationResponse
The base newspaper in St-Jean, called “Servir”, contains mostly French content. After reviewing the content of multiple editions of “Servir” most of the content is in fact, unilingual French, with the exception of a bilingual 4-page insert detailing Military Family Resource Centre services. To mitigate the noted concerns, “Servir” will be directed to comply with the Canadian Forces Newspaper policy issued 11 April 2005, which states that all Canadian Forces newspapers shall be published using a mix of English and French that equitably reflects the linguistic composition of the community being served.
Access to English daycare and English medical care is limited The Director Military Family Services has confirmed that, at the Military Family Resource Centre in Montreal, childcare and daycare services are available in both official languages and that children are addressed in their primary language. In addition, the Montreal Military Family Resource Centre has developed referral relationships with local Anglophone health care professionals to assist Canadian Forces Families in finding medical care in their language of choice.
Inadequate employment assistance is available for families, complicating integration into new linguistic environments Employment assistance programs for Canadian Forces families are offered as a mandated service through all Military Family Resource Centres. Director Military Family Services confirms that staff at the Gagetown and St-Jean Military Family Resource Centres are bilingual and provide services, including employment assistance programs, in the requested language of the CF community members. To ensure seamless integration into their communities, especially important for families joining a new linguistic environment, the Gagetown and Montreal Military Family Resource Centre websites are completely bilingual. All documentation produced by these Military Family Resource Centres is available in both official languages, including those relating to policy, guidelines and community needs assessment.

 

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Additional Information sheet on Language Training under Land Force Command (LFC)

QuestionLFC RESPONSECMP RESPONSE
In 2007, on which bases/ garrisons/ units / support units of LFC was Language Training offered ? Moncton, Gagetown, Valcartier, Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Montréal, Petawawa, Kingston, Toronto, London, Shilo, Edmonton, Wainwright, Esquimalt. In accordance with the OL Transformation Model, students at schools in St-Jean receive language training at the appropriate time.
What venues do the Official Language Coordinators take to publicize the language courses offered on their base/garrison/support unit of LFC to the military members? By using the routine orders, web sites, O-groups, base newspapers, visits to the units and through meetings with leaders at all levels.  
Is language training easily accessible and available? Based on the Military Second Language Training Plan a minimum number of 3 military members at the same learning level are required to run a course. This is done so to allow for a maximum of military members to attend Language Training.  
Decentralized Language Training is meant for who? To all Regular Force military members and Class B Reserve Force Members who work on a base and who are required to achieve a second language profile to meet the linguistic requirements of their functions. (BBB for the rank of major and below, CBC for colonels and above)  
What types of training are available on-site?

-In the Language Lab with a tutor for 10h/week

-In the classroom for 15 to 30 hours/ week, by blocks of 150 hours for the progress level of the beginner to intermediate level that has BBB as final objective.

-2 hours or more in the classroom or computer lab for maintenance course-Distance Learning when on-site training is not available

-One-on-one training for the language maintenance courses as offered to LCol and above (GO/COL program)

 
How many military members attended language training in 2007 on LFC bases, Garrisons, and support units? In LFC, 1053 military members attended language training- 266 officers on french language training, 24 on english language training, 347 non-commissioned members on French language training along with 416 on english language training.  

Note 1: Official Language Coordinators- are responsible for the environments and groups and stationed at all DND reporting levels. The Base Coordinator of Official Languages should be in close proximity to the HQs and fall under its authority. The status of these coordinators is varied: they may be either civilians or service personnel, and except for a few, they perform thee duties on a full time basis. All Units should appoint an official languages coordinator to advise management on matters related to official languages and to promote the program within their respective unit.

 
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Terms of Reference Base Coordinator Official Languages (BCOL) and Unit Coordinator Official Languages (UCOL)

Terms of Reference BCOLTerms of Reference UCOL

 

The Command Coordinator of Official Languages provides functional guidance to Area and Base Coordinator of Official Languages in the area of OL policy information, advice and interpretation, complaints, awareness and monitoring. In most cases, BCOL’s are at the rank of Captain or AS-04 and report to their Base Commanding Officer on OL issues.
 

  • Advisor Official Languages (OL) policy and directives to Base Commanding Officers and managers.
     
  • Implementing an OL awareness within the Base.
     
  • Resolves misinterpretations that could lead to OL complaints.
     
  • Monitors the provision of bilingual services and promoting bilingual activities on the Base.
     
  • Promoting the Local Military Second Language Training Program and second language testing services on the Base. Director of Base Language School.
     
  • Coordinates the provision of translation and terminology services on the Base.
     
  • Conducts performance measurement activities, including an annual review, to monitor progress in fulfilling the objectives of the OL Program on the Base.
     
  • Develops and conducts OL awareness/informational briefings to Base personnel.

 

Provision of Official Languages (OL) information and monitoring services to Unit Commanding Officers and managers.
 

Reporting Relationship
 

The Base Coordinator of Official Languages (BCOL) provides functional guidance to Unit Coordinator of Official Languages (UCOL) in the area of OL policy information, advice and interpretation, complaints, awareness and monitoring. In most cases, UCOL’s are at the rank of Captain and report to their Unit Commanding Officer on OL issues.
 

Activities
 

Implementing an OL awareness within the Unit by:
 

a. disseminating OL information to the unit’s personnel;
 

b. consulting with the BCOL in resolving misinterpretations that could lead to OL complaints;
 

Monitoring the progress of OL activities within the Unit by:
 

a. via call-letter from the BCOL and submission to the BCOL, preparing annual ‘adhoc’ OL reports for the signature of the Unit Commanding Officer and managers on the progress achieved and highlighting any delays in accomplishing the OL goals identified in the OL Operating Plan;
 

b. monitoring the provision of bilingual services and promoting bilingual activities in the Unit;
 

c. encouraging the use of both official languages in notices, announcements, signage and in the base/unit newspaper;
 

d. coordinating and ensuring the availability of bilingual administrative and technical work instruments.
 

Promoting the Local Military School Language Training Program and second language testing services on base by:
 

a. informing / advising unit personnel of second language training availability on base;
 

b. informing / advising unit personnel of second language testing services available on base;
 

c. informing / advising unit personnel to schedule re-test of second language profiles prior to expiry dates;
 

d. informing candidates of the registration procedures and modus operandi of language training (COS draft letter attached);
 

Coordinating the provision of translation and terminology services. (This may differ from on unit to another).
 

a. implementing directives on acquiring translation services;
 

b. ensuring the availability of terminology work instruments such as the manual of abbreviations, military lexicon, glossary of terms and definitions, Termium, etc.

 

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